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Course Information

Instructor Info:Kara Lynch
Office Extension x5686
Term: 2013F
Meeting Info: Tuesday Thursday
10:30 AM - 11:50 AM Cole Science Center 121
10:30 AM - 11:50 AM Cole Science Center 121
Tuesday
04:00 PM - 06:00 PM 131
Description:

This course will introduce students to interdisciplinary work in media and language acquisition. Students in this class will be active readers, lookers, thinkers, and makers. War is a subject making activity. We learn to engage with images, understand their proliferation, and to contend with them as a mass language. In recent years, the battle- and playing- fields have shifted and access to information and images has also changed. U.S. troops pull out of Iraq and Afghanistan, democracy movements emerge in the Middle East, Occupy movements take root in Europe and the U.S. and the War on Drugs claims new victims; meanwhile PDAs/Handheld technologies, social media networks, twitter, live web-streaming, podcasts, eclipse mass-media broadcast channels distributing news and information. These shifting terrains become points of contact between multi-lingual participants. Though English is a dominant online interface language, English speakers are more aware that our counterparts across the globe are facile in multiple languages -- and our access to 'what's really going on' expands once we add second and third languages to our repertoire. Students will engage with materials in multiple languages: Arabic, Spanish, English, visual, and digital in order to tap into resources that can elucidate and expand our understandings of struggles for democracy and sovereignty across the globe. Weekly reading and looking assignments will provoke written and visual responses. Students will participate in group work and dynamic class discussions. This is a rigorous theory/practice workshop class designed specifically for Division II students. We will challenge traditional modes of production and presentation collectively. Students will focus in on their critical skills that will enable them to describe, interpret, and evaluate the ways in which images represent the world around us and be required to produce written responses,  visual projects, and a research project/presentation. This will be a challenging course for serious students in the media arts, social sciences, and critical studies. This course has received funding from the Mellon Language Acquisition grant in order to incorporate foreign languages (in this case Spanish and Arabic) into the course.

Course Objectives:

This course will introduce students to interdisciplinary work in media and language acquisition. Students in this class will be active readers, lookers, thinkers, and makers. War is a subject making activity. We learn to engage with images, understand their proliferation, and to contend with them as a mass language.

Course methodology: Most work in this class will be done in small groups. Our discussion, learning, and communication takes place in and out of the classroom. In this way we will share our insights and take full advantage of our resources as a group.

 

Class discussions: This is where all of our thinking as a group comes together. This is a forum for articulating our ideas, thinking through difficult concepts, brainstorming and sharing our processes and approaches to learning with one another. In small groups, students will be responsible for leading class discussion 1x during the semester. This includes developing discussion questions that will promote in-depth reading of the assigned texts. Participation of all class-members is paramount.

Responses:  For each unit we cover, students will be responsible for responding in written and visual terms and for sharing these responses with the entire class. You will receive directed prompts for these assignments.

Group Project: In small groups students will work on a research project to be presented 2x in the semester: once at the midterm and in the last week of classes. This project will compare how war has been visualized in the modern period. Each group will select both a ‘past war’ and a ‘contemporary war’ and compare the visual culture around these two sites. Each group will develop a proposal and plan of action for the project and present it at the mid-term as a work in progress and in the last week of the semester as a final project. Presentations must incorporate images, text, critical analysis and a community engagement element is optional.

Evaluation Criteria:

1 final research/production project – culminating with an in-class presentation

weekly reading, looking, listening assignments

4-5 responses written +/or creative/visual

lead class discussion

participate in blog with posts and comments

attendance + participation in class discussions

self evaluation

 

Additional Info:

Academic integrity: Students are expected to duly acknowledge and recognize the work of others that inspires, sets a foundation for or influences their own original work. Please consult the student handbook for a detailed description of this.